Coming Next Month

Courts are still suffering the effects of the economic downturn.  August’s online Trends article looks at how North Carolina’s Magistrate Video Project is streamlining the arrest process and lowering costs for law enforcement and the state’s courts.

WHAT DO YOU THINK?

We'd love to hear what you think about our latest edition of Trends in State Courts 2014. Was it interesting? Did you find it useful? By participating in our survey, you will help us improve this publication in the years ahead.

Trends in State Courts 2014
  • Models for Change in Juvenile Justice Reform In Models for Change in Juvenile Justice Reform, Judge Bobbe J. Bridge discusses the newest wave in juvenile justice reform, encourages courts to adopt innovate practices and develop partnerships to improve outcomes for youth and their families. read more
  • Ark. initiative increases government awareness Responding to a troubling lack of basic civics knowledge, the Supreme Court of Arkansas launched the Arkansas Courts and Community Initiative. ACCI is engaging all members of the public to increase awareness about its system of government. read more
  • Submit abstracts for Trends 2015 Submissions for the 2015 edition are now being accepted. Please e-mail abstracts of no more than 500 words by October 15, 2014 to Deborah Smith at dsmith@ncsc.org. read more
     

Trends in State Courts 2014 focuses on what courts can do, and are doing, to serve the needs of society’s most vulnerable groups:  juveniles and the elderly.  Articles in two special sections focus on many aspects of juvenile justice and elder issues, such as the Models for Change Juvenile Justice Initiative funded by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, judicial leadership in addressing juvenile mental health issues, elder courts, and Working Interdisciplinary Networks of Guardianship Stakeholders.

Trends 2014 also addresses other topics of interest to state courts, such as improvement of jury service via technology, procedural fairness, and access to justice commissions.  A new section highlights court accomplishments in each state.