NCSC in the news

 
Rulings make judges legislative targets; impeachment bid in Pennsylvania

Impeachment threats have become more common in the last 10 years, according to Bill Raftery, a senior analyst at the National Center for State Courts. He tells the Times that, during the 2011-12 legislative session, lawmakers in seven states sought to oust judges. Read the full article in the ABA Journal.

 
Judges say throw out the map. Lawmakers say through out the judges.

As far back as the 1800s, New Hampshire's legislature disbanded the state's Supreme Court five times, said Bill Raftery, a senior analyst at the National Center for State Courts in Williamsburg, Va., who has tracked legislation affecting the judicial system for years. Read the full story in the New York Times.

 
Bearing the brunt of jury duty

A 2007 study by the National Center for State Courts showed that of the 10.2 million summonses mailed to California residents, only 192,884 of those people were selected to serve on a jury. The costs add up. Read the full story in the Register Pajaronian.

 
Richard Spencer and 2 others claim they can't find lawyers for Charlottesville defense

Going without a lawyer isn’t entirely uncommon. The National Center for State Courts, in a 2006 report, found a rise in the number of pro se litigants, particularly in divorce and family cases. Read the full story at the Southern Poverty Law Center.

 
Legislators strike a middle path between Martinez and judiciary on crime

Judicial salaries would jump on average by about 4.5 percent. The judiciary would welcome that — for several years, New Mexico judges’ salaries ranked at or near the bottom nationally in nearly every category. That changed at the beginning of the year, when the state plummeted to the cellar in all categories, according to a new survey released Jan. 1 by the National Center for State Courts. Read the full article on NMpolitics.net.

 
Policy of Openness Has Been Key Philosophy for Retiring Chief Justice

Rogers was appointed to the State Justice Institute’s board of directors in 2010 by President  Barack Obama, and was elected chairwoman on June 13, 2016. She has served on an advisory committee for the National Center for State Courts Expanding Court Access to Justice Project and the Conference of Chief Justices Civil Justice Initiative Committee. Read the full story in the Connecticut Law Tribune.

 
Essay contest on branches of government open to students

The National Center for State Courts is sponsoring the competition, which asks entrants to answer the following question in 100 words or fewer: “Why did our Founding Fathers create three branches of government?” Read the full article on the IndianaLawyer.com.

 
Iowa court administrator David Boyd wins national award

David K. Boyd, the former state court administrator for the Iowa Judicial Branch, was named the recipient of the National Center for State Courts' Warren E. Burger Award, named for the former U.S. Supreme Court justice. Read the full story in the Des Moines Register.

 
Do orders of protection actually shield domestic violence victims?

Victims of domestic violence should at least consider getting a protective order, says Susan Keilitz, JD, Principal Court Research Consultant at the National Center for State Courts and an expert on civil protection orders. Read the full story on theCrimeReport.org.

 
Raises for SC employees unlikely, but judges want a 20% pay hike

“South Carolina’s judicial salaries remain low compared to other states, according to the National Center for State Courts. This request is a first step toward establishing comparable salaries to other justices and judges across the country,” said Tonnya Kennedy Kohn, interim director of S.C. Court Administration. Read the full story in the State.

 
Movement Against Juvenile Court Fees Runs Into Resistance

A 2017 report by the National Center for State Courts found that most states do not have systems in place for juvenile probation supervision or to waive those fees when appropriate to do so. Read the full article on the Luxora Leader.

 
NM’s skeletal criminal justice system needs a cash infusion

The state Administrative Office of the Courts has asked for a $14 million increase this year, in part to boost the pay of New Mexico’s judges, which are the lowest paid in the nation, according to a report from the National Center for State Courts. Read the full article on NMPolitics.net.

 
NC justice system overhaul injects politics into state’s court system, critics say

Nowhere in America are so many changes coming to courts in such a relatively short time, says Bill Raftery, an analyst with the National Center for State Courts. Read the full article in the Charlotte Observer.

 
D.A., BP have an idea to fight recidivist crime on Staten Island - but will agencies get on board?

According to a 2013 report by the National Center for State Courts, the Red Hook Community Justice Center reduced recidivism and the number of people receiving jail sentences and helped strengthen neighborhoods. Read the full article on silive.com.

 
From our archives: "I'm it" - The only African American judge in Oregon's state court system, Adrienne Nelson

One final issue limits the pool of judicial candidates: Oregon pays its judges less than at least 47 other states, according to the National Center for State Courts, a nonprofit advocacy organization. When good lawyers can earn more as newly minted associates than as senior judges, it's hard to lure them from the private sector onto the bench.

 
Did prosecutors go too far in clearing a cop in a 2014 killing?

“The prosecutor has an amazing amount of control over a grand jury,” says Greg Hurley, an analyst with the National Center for State Courts. “They can signal the grand jury in a lot of different ways in terms of the outcome they're looking for.” Read the full story in the Portland Mercury.